When CBD is discussed, it is usually in the context of whether it can assist in treating a specific ailment or whether it is genuinely beneficial. It will not be long until the latest CBD creation, CBD Nanotechnology, comes up in any CBD conversation.

But, exactly, what is CBD nanotechnology? Is it anything that genuinely works, or is it just another ruse to get you to buy stuff?

We are as intrigued as you are. Continue reading if you are interested in learning more about CBD nanotechnology. You have come to the right place.

What Is CBD?

According to the US National Library of Medicine, CBD is a chemical component derived from the Cannabis sativa plant, also known as marijuana or hemp.

Nevertheless, a naturally occurring ingredient is utilized to create a sense of relaxation and serenity in items like oils and edibles. CBD is not psychoactive, unlike its cousin, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main active element in marijuana.

In regards to CBD, you’ve probably heard the names cannabis, marijuana, and hemp threw about. Hemp and marijuana are the two main species of Cannabis sativa. Both include CBD, but hemp has a far more significant amount than marijuana, which also has deficient THC levels (less than 0.3 percent).

To know more about CBD, Click Here.

What Is Nanotechnology?

Simply put, nanotechnology is anything that involves shrinking anything to nanoscopic proportions. No, this has nothing to do with Honey I Shrunk the Kids; in fact, it’s orders of magnitude lower than the size at which those kids were shrunk.

A single molecule of cannabidiol (CBD) is roughly 4440 nanometres in diameter as a comparison. So, when firms talk about decreasing particles to the size of nanoparticles, they’re talking about a 4440 percent reduction!

The notion is that by decreasing the particles to a tiny enough size, the body will break them apart and convert them into usable compounds that can interact with the endocannabinoid system more easily (ECS).

Is this, however, correct? Is it possible to boost CBD bioavailability by decreasing it down to the size of nanoparticles, as it seems impressive?

Is It Worth To Fuss?

CBD’s lipophilic properties, according to researchers, are the reason for its breakdown or utilization of nanotechnology.

Molecules can be either hydrophilic or lipophilic in theory. The term “hydrophilic” refers to the ability of particles to attach to water-based compounds. The other, on the other hand, is an oil-based chemical that is not water-soluble. CBD is a lipophilic compound.

Because humans are 70% water, they may have a hard time absorbing cannabidiol. Imagine pouring oil into a glass of water and expecting everything to come together. It takes time for the cannabidiol ingredient to be absorbed by the body. CBD is lipophilic, which means it repels water molecules that try to bind to it.

So, how will the body absorb CBD oil? This is where nanotechnology enters the picture. When a cannabinoid is broken down into nanoparticles, it interacts with water molecules differently. The actual relationships of these molecules have a more scientific explanation.

However, the truth remains that when CBD is broken down to nanoparticle size, it easily connects and binds to lipids and water molecules. This enables cannabinoids to be absorbed more quickly and easily.

Above all, CBD levels in the body are vastly improved by these nanoparticles.

Like any Trend, Nano CBD has its skeptics

Project CBD is a non-profit organization established in California that promotes and publicizes research into the medical applications of CBD and other cannabis plant components. Adrian Devit-Lee, their Chief Science Writer, is suspicious of nano CBD compositions.

He agrees with Kurek that the nanoemulsion theoretically makes CBD easier to absorb, but this does not imply that it is “practically” effective. Devit-Lee focuses on how people ingest cannabis chemicals in general as factors that could affect bioavailability independent of the formulation.

“The way the problem [with nanoemulsion] is often framed is ironic because it’s framed around potency,” he said. “When you eat CBD, if you take it first thing in the morning before food, you might absorb 3-6 percent. If you take it with fatty food, you might absorb more of it.”

And this is presuming that the CBD substance in the bottle matches the label’s description, which some CBD companies are known to do. In addition, the FDA issued multiple warning letters to CBD companies in 2019 for products that did not contain the claimed amount of CBD and for using wording that implied CBD might cure, treat, or prevent disease, which is a big FDA no-no.

Another source of concern is the safety of nanoparticles; when particles are reduced in size, unforeseen repercussions may occur. Nanotoxicology, the study of how designed nanodevices and structures may damage people, has risen because of the rising usage of nanotechnology in healthcare, agriculture, and consumer products.

Josh Lizotte, the creator and CEO of Rebel Coast cautioned against the usage of nanoemulsions in cannabis-infused wine in an explainer for Weedmaps News, citing health concerns. “We don’t know the health effects of nanotechnology and how such small particles [interact with] the body.”

He acknowledges that nanoparticles take half as long to start working as regular CBD and that the substance spends half as much time in your system.

The Implication Of Nanotechnology and CBD

Cannabinoid degradation is a problem with cannabinoids in general, regardless of how they are handled. When cannabis is collected, it starts to degrade, which means that the product’s strength, whether it is water or edible, will decrease. UV light, ventilation, humidity, and temperature are the top four elements that influence this process.

The mere act of opening and shutting the container will impair the efficiency of most CBD products, even if they are packaged to block out light. McDonald’s claims that the nanoemulsion method protects their products from degradation — through research to back this up is limited — and that all of their packaging is opaque to keep out light, except water.

Nano Technology Vs. Traditional CBD Oil Comparison

CBD Living can only raise the bar so high when it comes to producing pharmaceutical-grade CBD products. And that is their stated goal in the case of several patents currently under FDA assessment. In addition, CBD Living’s laboratory is also pursuing FDA Authorized Lab accreditation and licensing, which would be a first in the CBD business.

Consumers demand product homogeneity, high quality, safe, and practical items at this level. Contract producers from companies like CBD Living also require Nano CBD elements that are stable and duplicable. Otherwise, their products will fail to fulfill the FDA’s and consumers’ rigorous homogeneity requirements.

The “Current Good Manufacturing Practice” laws provide strict manufacturing standards and advice for the human pharmaceutical business (CGMP). “Packaging, Labeling, or Holding Operations for Dietary Supplements” is another piece of advice for the sector.

Since most people are unaware of CGMPs and how the FDA’s duty to ensure drug manufacturing standards, procedures, and processes works, I felt it would be helpful to touch on it so you may conduct additional research if you are interested. There are some signs that a rise in regulatory actions against pharma companies is driven by a failure to follow CGMP standards.

The Future Of CBD Nanotechnology

Cannabis had come a long way since the 1960s, when it first impacted the mainstream of society. Not only has the non-psychoactive side of the plant evolved as producers seek to provide patients with medicinal relief from cannabis without causing psychoactive effects on the mind, but many of the industry’s pioneers are now considering nanotechnology as well.

Researchers and scientists have devised techniques for developing plants with high CBD contents and low THC ones. The reason for this is that THC is still generally prohibited at specific amounts. CBD, on the other hand, has been declared lawful by the federal government.

As a result, farmers have begun cultivating hemp plants with greater control over the CBD content of their harvest. This means that more producers will develop plants that generate more CBD soon, minimizing waste and resulting in higher-quality goods.

Some researchers have gone so far as to investigate a person’s genetics and the effects of CBD on DNA. Everyone uniquely reacts to cannabis. CBD products tailored to your genetics may be available in the future, making your CBD therapy more successful.

CBD extraction from hemp plants has progressed significantly. Whereas ethanol, butane, and acetone were historically often used to extract CBD, improvements in the extraction sector have led to safer extraction methods, and we can now mainly avoid utilizing hydrocarbons. According to studies, hydrocarbons have been shown to bring carcinogenic chemicals into the crude extract from hemp plants.

Better quality CBD oil is derived from plants using safer, more effective, and ecologically friendly extraction methods (such as the Supercritical CO2 Extraction process, which is regarded as the gold standard in extraction). CBD products that are safer and of higher quality are becoming increasingly common on the market. As a result, we may see more of these items in the future, maybe at a lower price, as more manufacturers use the gold standard in extraction.

CBD, which is a fat-soluble chemical by nature, is also made more water-soluble using nanotechnology. This implies that any firm that uses nanotechnology to manufacture CBD-infused beverages, such as Recess—the La Croix-cannabis hybrid that everyone is talking about—is employing nanotechnology. Otherwise, the CBD would merely float on top of the liquid or adhere to the bottle or can’s edges. But what exactly is nanotechnology, and how can it help the CBD and cannabis industries?

Benefits And Side Effects Of CBD Nanotechnology

When it comes to CBD, nanotechnology is being employed to ensure that the CBD you’re taking truly reaches where it needs to be. According to Cade Turland, CEO and co-founder of Hemple, an Australian-owned hemp and CBD product firm that’s big on nano CBD, it’s all about speed, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness.

“When you do the arithmetic if you have a 10 mg bottle of conventional CBD oil, the most you’ll absorb into your cells is roughly 2 mg. However, if you take a nano-emulsified substance, you can achieve absorption before the digestive system and up to 8 mg into your cells.

According to Turland, nanotechnology can equal the rate of absorption seen during smoking. Hemple uses the N-OsmoTM extraction technology, which employs ultrasonic treatment to compress CBD molecules to a cell-friendly size.

CBD, which is a fat-soluble chemical by nature, is also made more water-soluble using nanotechnology. This implies that any firm that uses nanotechnology to manufacture CBD-infused beverages, such as Recess—the La Croix-cannabis hybrid that everyone is talking about—is employing nanotechnology. Otherwise, the CBD would merely float on top of the liquid or adhere to the bottle or can’s edges.

The Bottom Line

The CBD sector has a bright future ahead of it. We may expect better, safer, and more efficient products in the future, thanks to technical advancements in the industry. And, with so much research being undertaken, we may be able to identify even more ways that CBD can aid in treating many disorders.

Cannabinoid decomposition is a problem with cannabinoids in general, regardless of how they’re handled. When cannabis is collected, it starts to degrade, which means that the product’s strength, whether it’s water or edible, will decrease. UV light, ventilation, humidity, and temperature are the top four elements that influence this process.

So make sure your health is sharp before you consume CBD oils or Nanotechnology. And always check with the doctor.

The bottom line is that there isn’t enough research for a convincing case in either direction. So the only thing customers can do is shop carefully for CBD — nano or not — and purchase from firms based in the United States that can easily show you their third-party lab results and certificate of analysis.